The anxiety over election uncertainty has sneaked into markets, leaving enough room for a bigger market volatility for this week. The CBOE Volatility Index (.VIX) had already soared 40% from 15.67 on October 28 to 22.15 on November 3, while S&P 500 has lost 2.2% during the same period. On Friday, the S&P 500 index remained low for the longest period since December 1980. The pre- and post-election periods typically have opposite effects on an investor’s optimism. Pre-Election Period Real Clear Politics data shows that even though Clinton leads in most of the polls, the race could be a tight one. Except on 3 occasions sinceRead More →

On August 18, 2016, Donald J. Trump tweeted, “They will soon be calling me Mr. Brexit.” Markets may agree. The uncertainty of November 8 vote may impact markets similar to the EU Referendum, which resulted in the Brexit. The vote to leave the EU went against most economists’ perpetual warnings of a Brexit. The former British Prime Minister, David Cameron, Bank of England and HM Treasury had repeatedly warned Britons that Brexit would raise global economic concerns for the UK. But the unanticipated Brexit result sent markets in a flurry. Loss of confidence sent the pound to its lowest levels since 1985, London equity marketsRead More →

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) has been an ongoing trade deal that was finally agreed upon by all the 12 countries. The secret deal connects 12 countries of US, Brunei, Chile, Australia, Singapore, Japan, Mexico, Vietnam, New Zealand, Canada, Malaysia, and Peru. The regional trade deal is already receiving mixed reviews that are focused on the environmental, labor, trade and intellectual property issues  The trade deal establishes international common standards and is likely to be a threat to those countries that have been left out. Some of the non-TPP countries also happen to be large emerging markets like China, India, South Korea and Taiwan. The trade deal was put under ‘fast track’Read More →

Libor manipulation can bankrupt sixteen big banks and shake investors’ confidence. Libor rigging involves billions of dollars as profits. The big banks include Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase and Citigroup. While the first rigging case was brought to light in 2012 (Also Read: The LIBOR Fallout – A Big Bank scandal )the scandal dates back to as early as 2007-2008. Ironically, this was the time when the nation was going through its worst financial turmoil. London Inter-Bank  Offered Rate is known as libor and is the rate banks charge one another for loans in the London market. It acts as a benchmark and as a referenceRead More →

The outsourcing market in India has been thriving for years now and most of the entrepreneurs of some of the biggest Indian startups like Ola and Flipkart happen to be ex-employees of the US tech giants like Microsoft and Amazon. But the plight of startups in India may not be as optimistic as the ambitious Startup India Movement. Read More →