The year 2008 marked the advent of a financial crisis that began with a subprime scandal and mistakes made by credit rating agencies followed by the excesses of a financial capitalism that got seriously off track. This included the dissimulation of risks, unverified and highly complicated financial instruments, legal loopholes and the persistence of tax havens attracting a share of world savings that would be more justly used to finance investments and growth.In 2008, IMF had reported that these terrible lapses will cost the international banking system about a trillion dollars in the long-term.Read More →

‘Too Big to fail’ is a clear concept asserting that certain financial concerns are too large and well connected to fall apart and incases when this occurs the government should step in to bail them out.But does it hold true in all cases?A small write up on how this issue is big and ways to get it right.Read More →

A bank failure leads to an economic failure and in the past many similar failures have been faced all across the world but lessons are yet to be learnt. The recession of 2007-2013 is difference from previous depressions and bank failures simply because we are more globally connected and products like currency derivatives have just made banking across the world globally connected. This article looks at the Central banking system, focuses on shadow banking and breezes through the issue of systemic risk.Read More →

With the financial turmoil all across economies, Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa( popularly known as BRICS) remain the largest contributor in the world’s GDP i.e. 25% of global GDP and also 40% of the world’s population. With the recent meet in Durban, many contrast views have been expressed regarding to the aims and objectives of BRICS and whether it will be big as G7 by 2025 This article highlights a review on the same and its comparison to the Euro zone.Read More →

The Budget Control Act was a poison-pill deal designed to force them to find a less austere compromise, but political power struggle meant no deal was done, and the deadline arrived. A combination of expiring tax cuts and across-the-board government spending cuts scheduled to become effective December 31, 2012 defines ‘fiscal cliff’.Read More →